Our Gurkhas is an anthology of portraits and anecdotes from the retired Singapore Gurkhas as they reminisce about life in the Lion City – from the 1950s till modern day Singapore. This is a work in progress.

Retired staff sergeant Prem Bahadur Limbu holds on to a framed photograph of his late father retired chief inspector Man Bahadur Limbu. His father was a founding member of the Singapore Gurkha Contingent – the photograph was taken in 1963. He served from 1964 till 1991.
Our Gurkhas is an anthology of portraits and anecdotes from the retired Singapore Gurkhas as they reminisce about life in the Lion City – from the 1950s till modern day Singapore. This is a work in progress.

Retired police constable Mandhoj Gurung holds up a photograph of himself in uniform taken in his last few years before retirement. He served from 1949 till 1961.
Some three million Pakistanis from the scenic SWAT valley have fled for their safety from the government’s massive military offensive against the Taliban. This exodus of people is the largest since the Partition of India in 1947. Most live with their relatives in other parts of the country. Meanwhile, close to 300,000 Pakistanis seek shelter in refugee camps like Jalozai. Here they live in cramped tents, queuing for food supplies and preparing meals. For now, this is home.

Mother and child protest the military offensive by the Pakistani government that has resulted in an ever increasing death toll and displaced persons.
Where the mind is without fear and the head is held high;
Where knowledge is free;
Where the world has not been broken up into fragments by narrow domestic walls;
Where words come out from the depth of truth;
Where tireless striving stretches its arms towards perfection;
Where the clear stream of reason has not lost its way into the dreary desert sand of dead habit;
Where the mind is led forward by thee into ever-widening thought and action;
Into that heaven of freedom, my father, let my country awake.
- Rabindranath Tagore
Singaporeans from all walks of life – regardless of race, language and religion – come together to attend and listen to various political rally hotspots all over Singapore – in what is a contest of the hearts and minds of citizens during the 2011 General Elections. Though most Singaporeans have little interest in politics, these photographs depict otherwise. Close to 50,000 people were reported to have attended such rallies. Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party swept back to power and secured 81 of 87 seats in parliament but the six opposition seats lost were the highest since independence in 1965 for this young nation. Using a perspective control lens, it created a miniaturised and alternative perspective to the elections. For Singaplural, these common, and sometimes overlooked, spaces have combined a plurality of people, perspectives and ideas converging into one location during this elections.

Worker’s Party Election Rally. Yishun Stadium.
A tilt-shift perspective on the inaugural 2010 Youth Olympic Games held in Singapore.

Weightlifting. Toa Payoh Sports Hall.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
Our Gurkhas is an anthology of portraits and anecdotes from the retired Singapore Gurkhas as they reminisce about life in the Lion City – from the 1950s till modern day Singapore. This is a work in progress.

Retired staff sergeant Prem Bahadur Limbu holds on to a framed photograph of his late father retired chief inspector Man Bahadur Limbu. His father was a founding member of the Singapore Gurkha Contingent – the photograph was taken in 1963. He served from 1964 till 1991.
Our Gurkhas is an anthology of portraits and anecdotes from the retired Singapore Gurkhas as they reminisce about life in the Lion City – from the 1950s till modern day Singapore. This is a work in progress.

Retired corporal Nar Bahadur Gurung holds up a framed photograph of himself when he first arrived in Singapore in 1953. He served from 1953 till 1973.
Our Gurkhas is an anthology of portraits and anecdotes from the retired Singapore Gurkhas as they reminisce about life in the Lion City – from the 1950s till modern day Singapore. This is a work in progress.

Retired inspector Til Bahadur Khatri holds a framed photograph of himself in uniform in his last few years before retirement. He served from 1956 till 1983.
Our Gurkhas is an anthology of portraits and anecdotes from the retired Singapore Gurkhas as they reminisce about life in the Lion City – from the 1950s till modern day Singapore. This is a work in progress.

Retired staff sergeant Bhabhindra Bahadur Malla holding a photograph of himself in uniform just before his retirement. He served from 1960 till 1984.
Our Gurkhas is an anthology of portraits and anecdotes from the retired Singapore Gurkhas as they reminisce about life in the Lion City – from the 1950s till modern day Singapore. This is a work in progress.

Retired police constable Mandhoj Gurung holds up a photograph of himself in uniform taken in his last few years before retirement. He served from 1949 till 1961.
Our Gurkhas is an anthology of portraits and anecdotes from the retired Singapore Gurkhas as they reminisce about life in the Lion City – from the 1950s till modern day Singapore. This is a work in progress.

Retired police constable Jagan Bahadur Gurung holds up a framed photograph of himself in uniform, just a few years before retirement. He served from 1964 till 1982.
Our Gurkhas is an anthology of portraits and anecdotes from the retired Singapore Gurkhas as they reminisce about life in the Lion City – from the 1950s till modern day Singapore. This is a work in progress.

Retired inspector Dhanpati Gurung holds up a framed photoraph of himself on duty at 38 Oxley Road guardroom, near former prime minister Lee Kuan Yew's living residence taken in the late 1970s. He served from 1960 till 1984.
Our Gurkhas is an anthology of portraits and anecdotes from the retired Singapore Gurkhas as they reminisce about life in the Lion City – from the 1950s till modern day Singapore. This is a work in progress.

Retired inspector Miman Sing Gurung holds up a photograph of himself in his ceremonial uniform. This photograph was taken in 1970. He served from 1969 till 1983.
Our Gurkhas is an anthology of portraits and anecdotes from the retired Singapore Gurkhas as they reminisce about life in the Lion City – from the 1950s till modern day Singapore. This is a work in progress.

Retired staff sergeant Youm Kumar Tamang holds up a framed photograph of himself in uniform, taken just before retirement. He served from 1978 till 1994.
Our Gurkhas is an anthology of portraits and anecdotes from the retired Singapore Gurkhas as they reminisce about life in the Lion City – from the 1950s till modern day Singapore. This is a work in progress.

Retired inspector As Bahadur Limbu holds up a framed photograph of himself in uniform, taken in his last few years before retirement. He served from 1956 till 1983.
During the month of Ramadan, Muslims are encouraged to attend special congregational prayers at night called the terawih prayers.

Though most will make their way to the nearest mosque, some will opt for places closer to home such as void decks or multi-purpose halls – common spaces converted to a place of prayer during the fasting month. These musollas, which means a place for praying, for this month, becomes a place for the muslim community to meet their neighbours living in the same or adjacent housing estates.

Though it is unsure since when these common areas have been used for praying spaces, it has given the Muslim community greater flexibility to perform these special prayers—especially those living far away from the nearest mosque.

Venue: Multi-purpose hall, Block 775A Bedok Reservoir View.
During the month of Ramadan, Muslims are encouraged to attend special congregational prayers at night called the terawih prayers.

Though most will make their way to the nearest mosque, some will opt for places closer to home such as void decks or multi-purpose halls – common spaces converted to a place of prayer during the fasting month. These musollas, which means a place for praying, for this month, becomes a place for the muslim community to meet their neighbours living in the same or adjacent housing estates.

Though it is unsure since when these common areas have been used for praying spaces, it has given the Muslim community greater flexibility to perform these special prayers—especially those living far away from the nearest mosque.

Venue: Void deck, Block 286 Tampines Street 22.
During the month of Ramadan, Muslims are encouraged to attend special congregational prayers at night called the terawih prayers.

Though most will make their way to the nearest mosque, some will opt for places closer to home such as void decks or multi-purpose halls – common spaces converted to a place of prayer during the fasting month. These musollas, which means a place for praying, for this month, becomes a place for the muslim community to meet their neighbours living in the same or adjacent housing estates.

Though it is unsure since when these common areas have been used for praying spaces, it has given the Muslim community greater flexibility to perform these special prayers—especially those living far away from the nearest mosque.

Venue: Void deck, Block 610 Yishun Street 61.
During the month of Ramadan, Muslims are encouraged to attend special congregational prayers at night called the terawih prayers.

Though most will make their way to the nearest mosque, some will opt for places closer to home such as void decks or multi-purpose halls – common spaces converted to a place of prayer during the fasting month. These musollas, which means a place for praying, for this month, becomes a place for the muslim community to meet their neighbours living in the same or adjacent housing estates.

Though it is unsure since when these common areas have been used for praying spaces, it has given the Muslim community greater flexibility to perform these special prayers—especially those living far away from the nearest mosque.

Venue: Void deck, Block 60 Marine Drive.
During the month of Ramadan, Muslims are encouraged to attend special congregational prayers at night called the terawih prayers.

Though most will make their way to the nearest mosque, some will opt for places closer to home such as void decks or multi-purpose halls – common spaces converted to a place of prayer during the fasting month. These musollas, which means a place for praying, for this month, becomes a place for the muslim community to meet their neighbours living in the same or adjacent housing estates.

Though it is unsure since when these common areas have been used for praying spaces, it has given the Muslim community greater flexibility to perform these special prayers—especially those living far away from the nearest mosque.

Venue: Multi-purpose hall, Block 256 Serangoon Central.
During the month of Ramadan, Muslims are encouraged to attend special congregational prayers at night called the terawih prayers.

Though most will make their way to the nearest mosque, some will opt for places closer to home such as void decks or multi-purpose halls – common spaces converted to a place of prayer during the fasting month. These musollas, which means a place for praying, for this month, becomes a place for the muslim community to meet their neighbours living in the same or adjacent housing estates.

Though it is unsure since when these common areas have been used for praying spaces, it has given the Muslim community greater flexibility to perform these special prayers—especially those living far away from the nearest mosque.

Venue: Void deck, Block 60 Marine Drive.
During the month of Ramadan, Muslims are encouraged to attend special congregational prayers at night called the terawih prayers.

Though most will make their way to the nearest mosque, some will opt for places closer to home such as void decks or multi-purpose halls – common spaces converted to a place of prayer during the fasting month. These musollas, which means a place for praying, for this month, becomes a place for the muslim community to meet their neighbours living in the same or adjacent housing estates.

Though it is unsure since when these common areas have been used for praying spaces, it has given the Muslim community greater flexibility to perform these special prayers—especially those living far away from the nearest mosque.

Venue: Multi-purpose hall, Block 3A Geylang Serai.
During the month of Ramadan, Muslims are encouraged to attend special congregational prayers at night called the terawih prayers.

Though most will make their way to the nearest mosque, some will opt for places closer to home such as void decks or multi-purpose halls – common spaces converted to a place of prayer during the fasting month. These musollas, which means a place for praying, for this month, becomes a place for the muslim community to meet their neighbours living in the same or adjacent housing estates.

Though it is unsure since when these common areas have been used for praying spaces, it has given the Muslim community greater flexibility to perform these special prayers—especially those living far away from the nearest mosque.

Venue: Multi-purpose hall, Block 203 Punggol Field.
During the month of Ramadan, Muslims are encouraged to attend special congregational prayers at night called the terawih prayers.

Though most will make their way to the nearest mosque, some will opt for places closer to home such as void decks or multi-purpose halls – common spaces converted to a place of prayer during the fasting month. These musollas, which means a place for praying, for this month, becomes a place for the muslim community to meet their neighbours living in the same or adjacent housing estates.

Though it is unsure since when these common areas have been used for praying spaces, it has given the Muslim community greater flexibility to perform these special prayers—especially those living far away from the nearest mosque.

Venue: Void deck, Block 404 Pandan Gardens.
During the month of Ramadan, Muslims are encouraged to attend special congregational prayers at night called the terawih prayers.

Though most will make their way to the nearest mosque, some will opt for places closer to home such as void decks or multi-purpose halls – common spaces converted to a place of prayer during the fasting month. These musollas, which means a place for praying, for this month, becomes a place for the muslim community to meet their neighbours living in the same or adjacent housing estates.

Though it is unsure since when these common areas have been used for praying spaces, it has given the Muslim community greater flexibility to perform these special prayers—especially those living far away from the nearest mosque.

Venue: Link house, Block 536A Woodlands Drive 14.
During the month of Ramadan, Muslims are encouraged to attend special congregational prayers at night called the terawih prayers.

Though most will make their way to the nearest mosque, some will opt for places closer to home such as void decks or multi-purpose halls – common spaces converted to a place of prayer during the fasting month. These musollas, which means a place for praying, for this month, becomes a place for the muslim community to meet their neighbours living in the same or adjacent housing estates.

Though it is unsure since when these common areas have been used for praying spaces, it has given the Muslim community greater flexibility to perform these special prayers—especially those living far away from the nearest mosque.

Venue: Void deck, Block 725 Jurong West Street 72.
During the month of Ramadan, Muslims are encouraged to attend special congregational prayers at night called the terawih prayers.

Though most will make their way to the nearest mosque, some will opt for places closer to home such as void decks or multi-purpose halls – common spaces converted to a place of prayer during the fasting month. These musollas, which means a place for praying, for this month, becomes a place for the muslim community to meet their neighbours living in the same or adjacent housing estates.

Though it is unsure since when these common areas have been used for praying spaces, it has given the Muslim community greater flexibility to perform these special prayers—especially those living far away from the nearest mosque.

Venue: Multi-purpose Hall. Blk 562 Choa Chu Kang Street 52.
Singaporeans from all walks of life – regardless of race, language and religion – come together to attend and listen to various political rally hotspots all over Singapore – in what is a contest of the hearts and minds of citizens during the 2011 General Elections. Though most Singaporeans have little interest in politics, these photographs depict otherwise. Close to 50,000 people were reported to have attended such rallies. Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party swept back to power and secured 81 of 87 seats in parliament but the six opposition seats lost were the highest since independence in 1965 for this young nation. Using a perspective control lens, it created a miniaturised and alternative perspective to the elections. For Singaplural, these common, and sometimes overlooked, spaces have combined a plurality of people, perspectives and ideas converging into one location during this elections.

Worker’s Party Election Rally. Yishun Stadium.
Singaporeans from all walks of life – regardless of race, language and religion – come together to attend and listen to various political rally hotspots all over Singapore – in what is a contest of the hearts and minds of citizens during the 2011 General Elections. Though most Singaporeans have little interest in politics, these photographs depict otherwise. Close to 50,000 people were reported to have attended such rallies. Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party swept back to power and secured 81 of 87 seats in parliament but the six opposition seats lost were the highest since independence in 1965 for this young nation. Using a perspective control lens, it created a miniaturised and alternative perspective to the elections. For Singaplural, these common, and sometimes overlooked, spaces have combined a plurality of people, perspectives and ideas converging into one location during this elections.

Worker’s Party Election Rally. Open field, Hougang Ave 4.
Singaporeans from all walks of life – regardless of race, language and religion – come together to attend and listen to various political rally hotspots all over Singapore – in what is a contest of the hearts and minds of citizens during the 2011 General Elections. Though most Singaporeans have little interest in politics, these photographs depict otherwise. Close to 50,000 people were reported to have attended such rallies. Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party swept back to power and secured 81 of 87 seats in parliament but the six opposition seats lost were the highest since independence in 1965 for this young nation. Using a perspective control lens, it created a miniaturised and alternative perspective to the elections. For Singaplural, these common, and sometimes overlooked, spaces have combined a plurality of people, perspectives and ideas converging into one location during this elections.

Singapore Democratic Party Election Rally. Jurong East Stadium.
Singaporeans from all walks of life – regardless of race, language and religion – come together to attend and listen to various political rally hotspots all over Singapore – in what is a contest of the hearts and minds of citizens during the 2011 General Elections. Though most Singaporeans have little interest in politics, these photographs depict otherwise. Close to 50,000 people were reported to have attended such rallies. Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party swept back to power and secured 81 of 87 seats in parliament but the six opposition seats lost were the highest since independence in 1965 for this young nation. Using a perspective control lens, it created a miniaturised and alternative perspective to the elections. For Singaplural, these common, and sometimes overlooked, spaces have combined a plurality of people, perspectives and ideas converging into one location during this elections.

People’s Action Party Election Rally. Serangoon Stadium.
Singaporeans from all walks of life – regardless of race, language and religion – come together to attend and listen to various political rally hotspots all over Singapore – in what is a contest of the hearts and minds of citizens during the 2011 General Elections. Though most Singaporeans have little interest in politics, these photographs depict otherwise. Close to 50,000 people were reported to have attended such rallies. Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party swept back to power and secured 81 of 87 seats in parliament but the six opposition seats lost were the highest since independence in 1965 for this young nation. Using a perspective control lens, it created a miniaturised and alternative perspective to the elections. For Singaplural, these common, and sometimes overlooked, spaces have combined a plurality of people, perspectives and ideas converging into one location during this elections.

Worker’s Party Election Rally. Bedok Stadium.
Singaporeans from all walks of life – regardless of race, language and religion – come together to attend and listen to various political rally hotspots all over Singapore – in what is a contest of the hearts and minds of citizens during the 2011 General Elections. Though most Singaporeans have little interest in politics, these photographs depict otherwise. Close to 50,000 people were reported to have attended such rallies. Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party swept back to power and secured 81 of 87 seats in parliament but the six opposition seats lost were the highest since independence in 1965 for this young nation. Using a perspective control lens, it created a miniaturised and alternative perspective to the elections. For Singaplural, these common, and sometimes overlooked, spaces have combined a plurality of people, perspectives and ideas converging into one location during this elections.

Singapore People’s Party Election Rally. Open field, Jurong West Ave 3.
Singaporeans from all walks of life – regardless of race, language and religion – come together to attend and listen to various political rally hotspots all over Singapore – in what is a contest of the hearts and minds of citizens during the 2011 General Elections. Though most Singaporeans have little interest in politics, these photographs depict otherwise. Close to 50,000 people were reported to have attended such rallies. Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party swept back to power and secured 81 of 87 seats in parliament but the six opposition seats lost were the highest since independence in 1965 for this young nation. Using a perspective control lens, it created a miniaturised and alternative perspective to the elections. For Singaplural, these common, and sometimes overlooked, spaces have combined a plurality of people, perspectives and ideas converging into one location during this elections.

National Solidarity Party Election Rally. Open field, 35 Jalan Satu.
Singaporeans from all walks of life – regardless of race, language and religion – come together to attend and listen to various political rally hotspots all over Singapore – in what is a contest of the hearts and minds of citizens during the 2011 General Elections. Though most Singaporeans have little interest in politics, these photographs depict otherwise. Close to 50,000 people were reported to have attended such rallies. Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party swept back to power and secured 81 of 87 seats in parliament but the six opposition seats lost were the highest since independence in 1965 for this young nation. Using a perspective control lens, it created a miniaturised and alternative perspective to the elections. For Singaplural, these common, and sometimes overlooked, spaces have combined a plurality of people, perspectives and ideas converging into one location during this elections.

People’s Action Party Election Rally. Boat Quay next to UOB Plaza.
Singaporeans from all walks of life – regardless of race, language and religion – come together to attend and listen to various political rally hotspots all over Singapore – in what is a contest of the hearts and minds of citizens during the 2011 General Elections. Though most Singaporeans have little interest in politics, these photographs depict otherwise. Close to 50,000 people were reported to have attended such rallies. Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party swept back to power and secured 81 of 87 seats in parliament but the six opposition seats lost were the highest since independence in 1965 for this young nation. Using a perspective control lens, it created a miniaturised and alternative perspective to the elections. For Singaplural, these common, and sometimes overlooked, spaces have combined a plurality of people, perspectives and ideas converging into one location during this elections.

Singapore People’s Party Election Rally. Open field, Potong Pasir MRT.
Singaporeans from all walks of life – regardless of race, language and religion – come together to attend and listen to various political rally hotspots all over Singapore – in what is a contest of the hearts and minds of citizens during the 2011 General Elections. Though most Singaporeans have little interest in politics, these photographs depict otherwise. Close to 50,000 people were reported to have attended such rallies. Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party swept back to power and secured 81 of 87 seats in parliament but the six opposition seats lost were the highest since independence in 1965 for this young nation. Using a perspective control lens, it created a miniaturised and alternative perspective to the elections. For Singaplural, these common, and sometimes overlooked, spaces have combined a plurality of people, perspectives and ideas converging into one location during this elections.

Singapore Democratic Party Election Rally. Woodlands Stadium.
Singaporeans from all walks of life – regardless of race, language and religion – come together to attend and listen to various political rally hotspots all over Singapore – in what is a contest of the hearts and minds of citizens during the 2011 General Elections. Though most Singaporeans have little interest in politics, these photographs depict otherwise. Close to 50,000 people were reported to have attended such rallies. Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party swept back to power and secured 81 of 87 seats in parliament but the six opposition seats lost were the highest since independence in 1965 for this young nation. Using a perspective control lens, it created a miniaturised and alternative perspective to the elections. For Singaplural, these common, and sometimes overlooked, spaces have combined a plurality of people, perspectives and ideas converging into one location during this elections.

Singapore People’s Party Election Rally. Open field, Jurong West Ave 3.
Singaporeans from all walks of life – regardless of race, language and religion – come together to attend and listen to various political rally hotspots all over Singapore – in what is a contest of the hearts and minds of citizens during the 2011 General Elections. Though most Singaporeans have little interest in politics, these photographs depict otherwise. Close to 50,000 people were reported to have attended such rallies. Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party swept back to power and secured 81 of 87 seats in parliament but the six opposition seats lost were the highest since independence in 1965 for this young nation. Using a perspective control lens, it created a miniaturised and alternative perspective to the elections. For Singaplural, these common, and sometimes overlooked, spaces have combined a plurality of people, perspectives and ideas converging into one location during this elections.

National Solidarity Party Election Rally. Tampines Stadium.
Singaporeans from all walks of life – regardless of race, language and religion – come together to attend and listen to various political rally hotspots all over Singapore – in what is a contest of the hearts and minds of citizens during the 2011 General Elections. Though most Singaporeans have little interest in politics, these photographs depict otherwise. Close to 50,000 people were reported to have attended such rallies. Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party swept back to power and secured 81 of 87 seats in parliament but the six opposition seats lost were the highest since independence in 1965 for this young nation. Using a perspective control lens, it created a miniaturised and alternative perspective to the elections. For Singaplural, these common, and sometimes overlooked, spaces have combined a plurality of people, perspectives and ideas converging into one location during this elections.

People’s Action Party Election Rally. Open field, Ubi Road 3.
Singaporeans from all walks of life – regardless of race, language and religion – come together to attend and listen to various political rally hotspots all over Singapore – in what is a contest of the hearts and minds of citizens during the 2011 General Elections. Though most Singaporeans have little interest in politics, these photographs depict otherwise. Close to 50,000 people were reported to have attended such rallies. Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party swept back to power and secured 81 of 87 seats in parliament but the six opposition seats lost were the highest since independence in 1965 for this young nation. Using a perspective control lens, it created a miniaturised and alternative perspective to the elections. For Singaplural, these common, and sometimes overlooked, spaces have combined a plurality of people, perspectives and ideas converging into one location during this elections.

Worker’s Party Election Rally. Open field, Kallang Ave.
Singaporeans from all walks of life – regardless of race, language and religion – come together to attend and listen to various political rally hotspots all over Singapore – in what is a contest of the hearts and minds of citizens during the 2011 General Elections. Though most Singaporeans have little interest in politics, these photographs depict otherwise. Close to 50,000 people were reported to have attended such rallies. Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party swept back to power and secured 81 of 87 seats in parliament but the six opposition seats lost were the highest since independence in 1965 for this young nation. Using a perspective control lens, it created a miniaturised and alternative perspective to the elections. For Singaplural, these common, and sometimes overlooked, spaces have combined a plurality of people, perspectives and ideas converging into one location during this elections.

People’s Action Party Election Rally. Serangoon Stadium.
A tilt-shift perspective on the inaugural 2010 Youth Olympic Games held in Singapore.

Football. Jalan Besar Stadium.
A tilt-shift perspective on the inaugural 2010 Youth Olympic Games held in Singapore.

Gymnastics. Bishan Sports Hall.
A tilt-shift perspective on the inaugural 2010 Youth Olympic Games held in Singapore.

Aquatics, Swimming. Singapore Sports School.
A tilt-shift perspective on the inaugural 2010 Youth Olympic Games held in Singapore.

Badminton. Singapore Indoor Stadium.
A tilt-shift perspective on the inaugural 2010 Youth Olympic Games held in Singapore.

Athletics. Bishan Stadium.
A tilt-shift perspective on the inaugural 2010 Youth Olympic Games held in Singapore.

Equestrian. Singapore Turf Club Riding Centre.
A tilt-shift perspective on the inaugural 2010 Youth Olympic Games held in Singapore.

Archery. Kallang Field.
A tilt-shift perspective on the inaugural 2010 Youth Olympic Games held in Singapore.

Triathlon. East Coast Beach.
A tilt-shift perspective on the inaugural 2010 Youth Olympic Games held in Singapore.

Weightlifting. Toa Payoh Sports Hall.
A tilt-shift perspective on the inaugural 2010 Youth Olympic Games held in Singapore.

Volunteer. Tampines Bicycle Park.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Ministry of Design.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Ministry of Design.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Ministry of Design.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Vanguard Designs.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Vanguard Designs.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Vanguard Designs.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Splash.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Splash.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Splash.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Surround Studio.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Surround Studio.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Surround Studio.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Kennel.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Kennel.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Kennel.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Kennel.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

The Press Room.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

The Press Room.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

The Press Room.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

The Bureau.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

The Bureau.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

The Bureau.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Royalefam.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Royalefam.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

Royalefam.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

K2LD.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

K2LD.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

K2LD.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

FARM.
Commissioned by Art4d, a feature on creative spaces in Singapore ranging from architects, bicycle designers, graphic designers and photographers.

FARM.
In the beginning God made Heaven and Earth, everything else was made in China.
In the beginning God made Heaven and Earth, everything else was made in China.
In the beginning God made Heaven and Earth, everything else was made in China.
In the beginning God made Heaven and Earth, everything else was made in China.
In the beginning God made Heaven and Earth, everything else was made in China.
In the beginning God made Heaven and Earth, everything else was made in China.
In the beginning God made Heaven and Earth, everything else was made in China.
In the beginning God made Heaven and Earth, everything else was made in China.
In the beginning God made Heaven and Earth, everything else was made in China.
In the beginning God made Heaven and Earth, everything else was made in China.
In the beginning God made Heaven and Earth, everything else was made in China.
In the beginning God made Heaven and Earth, everything else was made in China.
Some three million Pakistanis from the scenic SWAT valley have fled for their safety from the government’s massive military offensive against the Taliban. This exodus of people is the largest since the Partition of India in 1947. Most live with their relatives in other parts of the country. Meanwhile, close to 300,000 Pakistanis seek shelter in refugee camps like Jalozai. Here they live in cramped tents, queuing for food supplies and preparing meals. For now, this is home.

Mother and child protest the military offensive by the Pakistani government that has resulted in an ever increasing death toll and displaced persons.
Some three million Pakistanis from the scenic SWAT valley have fled for their safety from the government’s massive military offensive against the Taliban. This exodus of people is the largest since the Partition of India in 1947. Most live with their relatives in other parts of the country. Meanwhile, close to 300,000 Pakistanis seek shelter in refugee camps like Jalozai. Here they live in cramped tents, queuing for food supplies and preparing meals. For now, this is home.

The men with their wheelbarrows queue up patiently for food supplies, such as oil and wheat, for their everyday meals in this camp supplied by the United Nations World Food Program.
Some three million Pakistanis from the scenic SWAT valley have fled for their safety from the government’s massive military offensive against the Taliban. This exodus of people is the largest since the Partition of India in 1947. Most live with their relatives in other parts of the country. Meanwhile, close to 300,000 Pakistanis seek shelter in refugee camps like Jalozai. Here they live in cramped tents, queuing for food supplies and preparing meals. For now, this is home.

Young Muhammad Yunus shows around his new home in Jalozai camp. He is only one of the estimated three million people in Pakistan who have been forced out of their home towns because of the military offensive from the Pakistani government against the Taliban.
Some three million Pakistanis from the scenic SWAT valley have fled for their safety from the government’s massive military offensive against the Taliban. This exodus of people is the largest since the Partition of India in 1947. Most live with their relatives in other parts of the country. Meanwhile, close to 300,000 Pakistanis seek shelter in refugee camps like Jalozai. Here they live in cramped tents, queuing for food supplies and preparing meals. For now, this is home.

The men with their wheelbarrows queue up patiently for food supplies, such as oil and wheat, for their everyday meals in this camp.
Some three million Pakistanis from the scenic SWAT valley have fled for their safety from the government’s massive military offensive against the Taliban. This exodus of people is the largest since the Partition of India in 1947. Most live with their relatives in other parts of the country. Meanwhile, close to 300,000 Pakistanis seek shelter in refugee camps like Jalozai. Here they live in cramped tents, queuing for food supplies and preparing meals. For now, this is home.

Mother and child make their way back to their shelter.
Some three million Pakistanis from the scenic SWAT valley have fled for their safety from the government’s massive military offensive against the Taliban. This exodus of people is the largest since the Partition of India in 1947. Most live with their relatives in other parts of the country. Meanwhile, close to 300,000 Pakistanis seek shelter in refugee camps like Jalozai. Here they live in cramped tents, queuing for food supplies and preparing meals. For now, this is home.

Tens to hundreds of children rush to receive the afternoon milk for their families – a favourite for most Pakistanis.
Some three million Pakistanis from the scenic SWAT valley have fled for their safety from the government’s massive military offensive against the Taliban. This exodus of people is the largest since the Partition of India in 1947. Most live with their relatives in other parts of the country. Meanwhile, close to 300,000 Pakistanis seek shelter in refugee camps like Jalozai. Here they live in cramped tents, queuing for food supplies and preparing meals. For now, this is home.

Within the camp, a seperate area is used to prepare meals cooked in large metal pots. Feeding 50,000 is a big task.
Some three million Pakistanis from the scenic SWAT valley have fled for their safety from the government’s massive military offensive against the Taliban. This exodus of people is the largest since the Partition of India in 1947. Most live with their relatives in other parts of the country. Meanwhile, close to 300,000 Pakistanis seek shelter in refugee camps like Jalozai. Here they live in cramped tents, queuing for food supplies and preparing meals. For now, this is home.

A young boy takes shelter from the heat outside his temporary home in Mardan. Families who fled the SWAT Valley seek refuge from their relatives instead of living in camps under poor conditions. Here they will wait patiently till it is safe to return.
Some three million Pakistanis from the scenic SWAT valley have fled for their safety from the government’s massive military offensive against the Taliban. This exodus of people is the largest since the Partition of India in 1947. Most live with their relatives in other parts of the country. Meanwhile, close to 300,000 Pakistanis seek shelter in refugee camps like Jalozai. Here they live in cramped tents, queuing for food supplies and preparing meals. For now, this is home.

A young girl stands outside her shelter in Jalozai camp, once home to Afghan refugees in the 80s. Now, close to 300,000 displaced Pakistanis seek shelter in these camps to escape the conflict in the North-West Frontier Province.
Some three million Pakistanis from the scenic SWAT valley have fled for their safety from the government’s massive military offensive against the Taliban. This exodus of people is the largest since the Partition of India in 1947. Most live with their relatives in other parts of the country. Meanwhile, close to 300,000 Pakistanis seek shelter in refugee camps like Jalozai. Here they live in cramped tents, queuing for food supplies and preparing meals. For now, this is home.

Protestors burn an American flag outside the Faisal Mosque in Islamabad as anti-American sentiments run high amidst the big military offensive against the Taliban from the Pakistani government.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
'Forget Kathmandu' is the title of a book written by eminent Nepali writer Manjushree Thapa. In the book she describes the country's tumultuous political history as Nepal now transitions from a monarchy to federal republic — an elegy for democracy she says.
From bullet to ballot some may say, yet Nepal faces teething problems from agitating political parties crippling — through strikes, protests, torch rallies and rioting — the country and its day to day activities.

Though the abolishment of the monarchy renewed much hope for their country, this becomes a source of frustration for its people as they constantly advise others, foreigners like me, to simply, forget Kathmandu.
Where the mind is without fear and the head is held high;
Where knowledge is free;
Where the world has not been broken up into fragments by narrow domestic walls;
Where words come out from the depth of truth;
Where tireless striving stretches its arms towards perfection;
Where the clear stream of reason has not lost its way into the dreary desert sand of dead habit;
Where the mind is led forward by thee into ever-widening thought and action;
Into that heaven of freedom, my father, let my country awake.
- Rabindranath Tagore
Where the mind is without fear and the head is held high;
Where knowledge is free;
Where the world has not been broken up into fragments by narrow domestic walls;
Where words come out from the depth of truth;
Where tireless striving stretches its arms towards perfection;
Where the clear stream of reason has not lost its way into the dreary desert sand of dead habit;
Where the mind is led forward by thee into ever-widening thought and action;
Into that heaven of freedom, my father, let my country awake.
- Rabindranath Tagore
Where the mind is without fear and the head is held high;
Where knowledge is free;
Where the world has not been broken up into fragments by narrow domestic walls;
Where words come out from the depth of truth;
Where tireless striving stretches its arms towards perfection;
Where the clear stream of reason has not lost its way into the dreary desert sand of dead habit;
Where the mind is led forward by thee into ever-widening thought and action;
Into that heaven of freedom, my father, let my country awake.
- Rabindranath Tagore
Where the mind is without fear and the head is held high;
Where knowledge is free;
Where the world has not been broken up into fragments by narrow domestic walls;
Where words come out from the depth of truth;
Where tireless striving stretches its arms towards perfection;
Where the clear stream of reason has not lost its way into the dreary desert sand of dead habit;
Where the mind is led forward by thee into ever-widening thought and action;
Into that heaven of freedom, my father, let my country awake.
- Rabindranath Tagore
Where the mind is without fear and the head is held high;
Where knowledge is free;
Where the world has not been broken up into fragments by narrow domestic walls;
Where words come out from the depth of truth;
Where tireless striving stretches its arms towards perfection;
Where the clear stream of reason has not lost its way into the dreary desert sand of dead habit;
Where the mind is led forward by thee into ever-widening thought and action;
Into that heaven of freedom, my father, let my country awake.
- Rabindranath Tagore
Where the mind is without fear and the head is held high;
Where knowledge is free;
Where the world has not been broken up into fragments by narrow domestic walls;
Where words come out from the depth of truth;
Where tireless striving stretches its arms towards perfection;
Where the clear stream of reason has not lost its way into the dreary desert sand of dead habit;
Where the mind is led forward by thee into ever-widening thought and action;
Into that heaven of freedom, my father, let my country awake.
- Rabindranath Tagore
Where the mind is without fear and the head is held high;
Where knowledge is free;
Where the world has not been broken up into fragments by narrow domestic walls;
Where words come out from the depth of truth;
Where tireless striving stretches its arms towards perfection;
Where the clear stream of reason has not lost its way into the dreary desert sand of dead habit;
Where the mind is led forward by thee into ever-widening thought and action;
Into that heaven of freedom, my father, let my country awake.
- Rabindranath Tagore
ZAKARIA ZAINAL

Zakaria Zainal was born and raised in Singapore in 1985, as a Malay-Muslim son in a Chinese dominated society. He makes meaning of the world through his photographs. Enticed by the visceral changes of a former monarchy’s transition to a federal republic in Nepal, he first picked up his camera. His first monograph, “Our Gurkhas: Singapore Through Their Eyes” is an anthology of portraits and anecdotes of the retired Singapore Gurkhas as they reminisce about life in the Lion City, from the 1950s till today.

His photographs and stories have appeared in various publications both in Singapore and Asia. He graduated from the NTU’s School of Communication, where he also teaches campus journalism. While he continues making pictures, Zakaria has been moving away from traditional documentary work to photographing closer to home – or even closer to his heart.


CREDITS & COPYRIGHT:
Photography & text by Zakaria Zainal. All images copyright © 2008-2013 Zakaria Zainal. Zainal & Zainal LLP (Reg No: T11LL1809H). All images and text on this website are property of Zakaria Zainal and are protected by international copyright laws. No images or text may be used or reproduced in any form without the written permission of Zakaria Zainal.
Recognition:
2011 PLATFORM. Platform Ten 2011. Singapore.
2011 The Straits Times. Through the Lens. Spotlight Photographer. Singapore.
2011 Invisible Photographer Asia. Top 10 Most Popular Photo Essays 2011. Singapore.
2012 TODAY. Youth Focus. Singapore.
2012 Honourable Mention, Photo Annual Awards 2012 for Our Gurkhas. Czech Republic.
2012 Honourable Mention, Fotovisura Grant 2011 for Our Gurkhas. United States.
2012 Selected Artist, The Philanthropic Museum. Singapore.
2013 Our Gurkhas, Verve Photo: The New Breed of Documentary Photographers.

Exhibitions:
2012 CUT 2012: New Photography From Southeast Asia. Valentine Willie Fine Art Gallery. Singapore (Group).
2012 Singapore Survey: Strange New Faces. Valentine Willie Fine Art Gallery. Singapore (Group).
2012 Open Call. 3rd Singapore International Photography Festival. Singapore (Group).
2012 Our Gurkhas: Singapore Through Their Eyes, A Traveling Exhibition. photo.circle. Nepal (Solo).
2012 Our Gurkhas: Singapore Through Their Eyes. Kathmandu International Mountain Film Festival. Nepal (Solo).
2012 Our Gurkhas, DIVERCITY. Singapore International Foundation. Singapore (Group).
2013 NOMAD under SIPF, 5th Dali International Photo Festival. Yunnan, China (Group).
2013 NOMAD under SIPF, TWENTY Noorderlicht International Photofestival. Groningen, Netherlands (Group).


Selected Books:
2011 "Through Regular Channels", as part of "GE 11: We Were There". Singapore.
2012 Mosaic Memories. Singapore Memory Project. Singapore.
2012 Gila Bola! Surviving Singapore Soccer. Singapore Memory Project. Singapore.
2012 "Our Gurkhas: Singapore Through Their Eyes". Epigram Books. Singapore.


Selected Talks:
2010 Youth Olympic Gamescapes. Platform 10.9. Singapore.
2011 Our Gurkhas. Platform 11.11. Singapore.
2011 Our Gurkhas. TEDxYouth Singapore. Singapore.
2013 Our Gurkhas. TEDx Singapore. Singapore.

Editorial Clients:
Art4d
TimeOut Singapore
The Straits Times
Nepali Times
Republica
Exposure Magazine
What's Up
Poskod
Fivefootway
Invisible Photographer Asia
More Space
Challenge Magazine
CARING Magazine
Modus

Commercial Clients:
Grundfos Singapore
Star Cruises Pte Ltd
Changi General Hospital
Epson
National Heritage Board
Singapore Memory Project
Shinnyo-en Singapore
Methodist Welfare Services
NTU WKW School of Communication
KONE
Studiowonghuzir
Checkpoint Theatre
Ong Shunmugam
Gypsied
JJ-Lapp Cable